Hoover Dam

Hoover Dam, once known as Boulder Dam, is a concrete arch-gravity dam in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River, on the border between the U.S. states of Nevada and Arizona. It was constructed between 1931 and 1936 during the Great Depression and was dedicated on September 30, 1935, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Its construction was the result of a massive effort involving thousands of workers, and cost over one hundred lives. The dam was named after President Herbert Hoover.

Since about 1900, the Black Canyon and nearby Boulder Canyon had been investigated for their potential to support a dam that would control floods, provide irrigation water and produce hydroelectric power. In 1928, Congress authorized the project. The winning bid to build the dam was submitted by a consortium called Six Companies, Inc., which began construction on the dam in early 1931. Such a large concrete structure had never been built before, and some of the techniques were unproven. The torrid summer weather and lack of facilities near the site also presented difficulties. Nevertheless, Six Companies turned over the dam to the federal government on March 1, 1936, more than two years ahead of schedule.

Hoover Dam impounds Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the United States by volume. The dam is located near Boulder City, Nevada, a municipality originally constructed for workers on the construction project, about 30 mi (48 km) southeast of Las Vegas, Nevada. The dam’s generators provide power for public and private utilities in Nevada, Arizona, and California. Hoover Dam is a major tourist attraction; nearly a million people tour the dam each year. The heavily travelled U.S. 93 ran along the dam’s crest until October 2010, when the Hoover Dam Bypass opened. Now know as Mike O’Callaghan–Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoover_Dam

Visiting Hoover Dam

http://www.usbr.gov/lc/hooverdam/

Aerial view of the Hoover Dam and part of the Lake Mead.

Aerial view of the Hoover Dam and part of the Lake Mead.

Old tunnel and gravel pathway that was used during the construction of the dam.

Old tunnel and gravel pathway that was used during the construction of the dam.

View of Lake Mead, around 10 Million people come to this recreational area each year.

View of Lake Mead, around 10 Million people come to this recreational area each year.

View of the dam from the Arizona side.

View of the dam from the Arizona side.

The intake towers to the dam, each tower is 395' in height from the base.

The intake towers to the dam, each tower is 395′ in height from the base.

The intake towers to the dam, each tower is 395' in height from the base.

The intake towers to the dam, each tower is 395′ in height from the base.

The massive concrete curtain has a base of 660'  and its maximum depth is 589'. the crest is 1244 feet. long and 45' wide. View from the Arizona side.

The massive concrete curtain has a base of 660′ and its maximum depth is 589′. the crest is 1244 feet. long and 45′ wide. View from the Arizona side.

The Hoover dam was built from 1931 to 1935.

The Hoover dam was built from 1931 to 1935.

The massive concrete curtain has a base of 660'  and its maximum depth is 589'. the crest is 1244 feet. View from the Nevada side.

The massive concrete curtain has a base of 660′ and its maximum depth is 589′. the crest is 1244 feet. View from the Nevada side.

 

Architectural style

The initial plans for the facade of the dam, the power plant, the outlet tunnels and ornaments clashed with the modern look of an arch dam. The Bureau of Reclamation, more concerned with the dam’s functionality, adorned it with a Gothic-inspired balustrade and eagle statues. This initial design was criticized by many as being too plain and unremarkable for a project of such immense scale, so Los Angeles-based architect Gordon B. Kaufmann, then the supervising architect to the Bureau of Reclamation, was brought in to redesign the exteriors. Kaufmann greatly streamlined the design, and applied an elegant Art Deco style to the entire project. He designed sculptured turrets rising seamlessly from the dam face.

At Kaufmann’s request, Denver artist Allen Tupper True was hired to handle the design and decoration of the walls and floors of the new dam. True’s design scheme incorporated motifs of the Navajo and Pueblo tribes of the region. Although some initially were opposed to these designs, True was given the go-ahead and was officially appointed consulting artist. With the assistance of the National Laboratory of Anthropology, True researched authentic decorative motifs from Indian sand paintings, textiles, baskets and ceramics. The images and colors are based on Native American visions of rain, lightning, water, clouds, and local animals -lizards, serpents, birds- and on the Southwestern landscape of stepped mesas. In these works, which are integrated into the walkways and interior halls of the dam.

Navajo and Pueblo tribes of the region designs were used by Denver artist Allen Tupper.

Navajo and Pueblo tribes of the region designs were used by Denver artist Allen Tupper, on the interior decoration.

Architect Gordon B. Kaufmann was influenced by "Art Deco" style around the exterior design.

Architect Gordon B. Kaufmann was influenced by “Art Deco” style around the exterior design.

Architect Gordon B. Kaufmann was influenced by "Art Deco" style around the exterior design.

Architect Gordon B. Kaufmann was influenced by “Art Deco” style around the exterior design.

Architect Gordon B. Kaufmann was influenced by "Art Deco" style around the exterior design.

Architect Gordon B. Kaufmann was influenced by “Art Deco” style around the exterior design.

 

 

Inside the Hoover dam where more than 7 million people walk and visit this massive structure, every year.

 

Inside the Hoover dam.

Inside the Hoover dam.

This are the 13' Penstocks that feed the generator to produce electricity.

This are the 13′ Penstocks that feed the generators to produce electricity.

Vintage diagram of the Hoover dam complex hangs on the interior where the 13' Penstocks are located.

Vintage framed diagram of the Hoover dam complex hangs on the interior where the 13′ Penstocks are located.

A lighted diagram of the dam.

A lighted diagram of the dam.

The generator room on the Nevada side.

The generators room on the Nevada side.

 

The Mike O’Callaghan–Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge is an arch bridge in the United States that spans the Colorado River between the states of Arizona and Nevada. The bridge is located within the Lake Mead National Recreation Area approximately 30 miles (48 km) southeast of Las Vegas, and carries U.S. Route 93 over the Colorado River. Opened in 2010, it was the key component of the Hoover Dam Bypass project, which rerouted US 93 from its previous routing along the top of Hoover Dam and removed several hairpin turns and blind curves from the route. It is jointly named for Mike O’Callaghan. Governor of Nevada from 1971–1979, and Pat Tillman, an American football player who left his career with the Arizona Cardinals to enlist in the United States Army and was later killed in Afghanistan by “friendly fire.”

The bridge was the first concrete-steel composite arch bridge built in the United States, and it incorporates the widest concrete arch in the Western Hemisphere. At 840 feet (260 m) above the Colorado River, it is the second-highest bridge in the United States, following the Royal Gorge Bridge. It is also the world’s highest concrete arch bridge. The Hoover Dam Bypass project was completed within budget at a cost of $240 million; the bridge portion cost $114 million (2010 prices).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_O’Callaghan%E2%80%93Pat_Tillman_Memorial_Bridge

Driving to the O'Callaghan-Tillman bridge.

Driving to the O’Callaghan-Tillman bridge.

Driving to the O'Callaghan-Tillman bridge.

Driving to the O’Callaghan-Tillman bridge a view of the Colorado river.

July 24-30, 2011. As a surprise trip we went to Las Vegas. Meztli and Atl Did not know that their Grandparents drove down from Payette Idaho to pick them up and they spent over a month with them. We went to the marvelous Engineering work at the Hoover Dam, at the borders of Nevada and Arizona, on the Colorado river.

View of the Colorado river while driving to the O’Callaghan-Tillman bridge.

Driving to the O'Callaghan-Tillman bridge.

Driving to the O’Callaghan-Tillman bridge.

Dedication plate of the bridge.

Dedication plate of the bridge.

At 110ºF degrees was a hot walk on top of the bridge.

At 110ºF degrees was a hot walk on top of the bridge.

At 110ºF degrees was a hot walk on top of the bridge. A view of the front of the dam from the bridge.

At 110ºF degrees was a hot walk on top of the bridge. A view of the front of the dam from the bridge.

July 24-30, 2011. As a surprise trip we went to Las Vegas. Meztli and Atl Did not know that their Grandparents drove down from Payette Idaho to pick them up and they spent over a month with them. We went to the marvelous Engineering work at the Hoover Dam, at the borders of Nevada and Arizona, on the Colorado river.

At 110ºF degrees it was a hot walk on top of the bridge. A view  Hoover Dam, at the borders of Nevada and Arizona, the Colorado river at the bottom and the bridge shadow.

At 110ºF degrees was a hot walk on top of the bridge. Walking out the bridge an inviting sign for an AC place...

At 110ºF degrees was a hot walk on top of the bridge. Walking out the bridge an inviting sign for an AC place…

 

It has been a lot of controversy on what happened to Pat Tillman who was kill in Afghanistan by a “friendly fire” for those who are more interested please follow the link bellow.

What Really Happened To Pat Tillman?

His Mother Tells 60 Minutes The Govt. Still Hasn’t Told The Whole Truth About Her Son’s Death

Aired May 1st 2008
Pat Tillman was a heroic face of the war on terror – an NFL star who left behind a $3.6 million contract and his new wife to fight for his country after the attacks of Sept. 11. When he died in Afghanistan on April 22, 2004, the Army told his family he’d been killed by enemy fire after courageously charging up a hill to protect his fellow Army Rangers.

But as Katie Couric reports, that story didn’t hold up. He had really been killed by friendly fire, shot accidentally by his fellow soldiers.

For the past four years, his family, led by his mother Mary, has been searching for answers about what really happened, beginning the day she heard the news from Pat Tillman’s wife Marie. You can read the full transcript at:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/what-really-happened-to-pat-tillman/

About marcocastrophotography

I was born and raised in México City, where the mixture of cultures gave birth to the nation that we know as México. My grandmother was the last in my family who spoke fluent Nahuatl, the language of the Aztecs. Due to the racism in those days, she never taught her daughters the language, and therefore, we, as a family, lost our cultural heritage. I have been involved, however, with the indigenous world, even though I do not believe this happened by coincidence. I have a background as a graphic designer, one credit short of a BA in Graphic Communication Design from the National School of Visual Arts, National Autonomous University of Mexico (ENAP-UNAM). While in a Photographic Workshop at the University Center of Cinematographic Studies (CUEC-UNAM), I met a photographer who changed my life forever: Ignacio “Nacho” López. I can still see how strongly he influences me when I develop my work in my digital darkroom. I have also had the opportunity to share marvelous moments with photographers like Dolores Alvarez-Bravo, Hector García, Lázaro Blanco, and Walter Reuter who introduced me to the etnia Triqui in Oaxaca, Mexico (Triqui Nation). I traveled and worked as Reuter's assistant for several years. I moved to New York City in 1993, which was a dream of mine for years. Here I have had the opportunity to collaborate with newspapers, magazines, and several news organizations, as well as literary publications. I also have been working as a photographer-consultant for the United Nations headquarters in New York City for the past six years at the openings of the General Assemblies. I spent endless hours in my darkroom, even mixing my own chemicals blowing up my prints back in my hometown; skills that I apply today in my digital work with attention to detail. I hold a BA on Communication and Culture from the School of Professional Studies at the Graduate Center City University of New York class of 2010. I consider myself as a Photojournalist with a Humanistic approach; I have an opportunity to rapidly built rapport with my subjects allowing me to break the barriers of language and culture; this open the doors for me to get a glimpse at their experience on their daily life and activities. Taking advantage of the old school and the digital imagining, I take the Previsualization of an image as taught by Anselm Adams with the algorithms of the new digital era and combine them to enhance what I see and experience at the moment of capture. My experience as a printer in Black and White darkroom, has allow me to choose the right material to support my imaginery. Using the Canon Pro9500 MarkII with it’s high-performance, high-density 7680 nozzle FINE print head that produces ink droplets as small as 3-picoliters for stunning, true-to-life images. The Canon LUCIA ink system guarantees archival photo life up to 100 years. All this in a 100 % acid-free cotton paper as the Moab Somerset enhanced velvet 225gsm. In 13” by 19” prints that I sale as fine art. As freelance Photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. Am always open for the booking of my expertise and for hire anywhere in the world as I hold two passports as Mexican-American and a driver’s license for the State of New York.
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